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ENGR Course Outcomes

ENGR 1020 - Introduction to Engineering and Technology

  • To acquaint the student to the various fields of engineering and technology.
  • To enable the student to identify, formulate, and solve engineering and engineering technology problems.
  • To enable the student to communicate effectively.
  • To equip the student with the latest technology.
  • To enable the student to apply the team approach to assigned projects.

ENGR 1030 - Engineering Graphics

  • To acquaint the student to the various fields of engineering and technology.
  • To enable the student to utilize analytical and non-analytical tools to complete homework assignments, lab activities, and team projects.
  • To enable the student to apply techniques of problem solving to engineering examples.
  • To enable the student to apply the team approach to assigned projects.
  • To enable the student to communicate effectively.
  • To introduce the student to the latest technology.
  • Be proficient in Solidworks graphical software.
  • Represent a three dimensional objects on one drawing plane with multiple views that are mutual perpendicular to each other.
  • Understand the concept of true length of line and the true shape of an oblique plane.
  • Have a functioning knowledge for solving problems that relate to intersections and developments of complex solid prisms and cones that intersect at oblique angles.
  • Understand the significance of a working drawing and proper dimensioning.

ENGR 2050 - Engineering Mechanics - Statics

  • Understand the fundamental concepts and principles of mechanics.
  • Manipulate force vectors in a plane (2D) and in space (3D).
  • Use Vector algebra to manipulate moments about a point and about an axis.
  • Utilize equations of equilibrium in two and three dimensions.
  • Calculate centroids of lines, areas, and volumes.
  • Determine centroids by parts and by integration.
  • Analyze trusses by method of joints and method of sections.
  • Understand basic force distribution internal to beams.
  • Include frictional forces and friction angles in equilibrium problems.
  • Determine moments of inertia by integration.
  • Calculate radius of gyration of an area.
  • Understand the importance of coordinate axis to moments.
  • Transfer moments by parallel axis theorem.

ENGR 2060 - Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics

  • Define rectilinear and curvilinear components of motion.
  • Utilize calculus to determine kinematic quantities.
  • Work in Cartesian space as well as normal/tangential and radial/transverse.
  • Solve problems with equation of motion and dynamic equilibrium.
  • Utilize principle of work and energy.
  • Demonstrate understanding of conservation of energy.
  • Utilize principle of impulse and momentum.
  • Demonstrate understanding of conservation of momentum.
  • Solve dynamic problems involving direct and oblique central impact.
  • Extend kinematic knowledge from particles to rigid bodies.
  • Identify motion involving translation, rotation, and a combination.
  • Apply force and acceleration dynamics to rigid bodies.
  • Apply work and energy to rigid bodies.
  • Apply impulse and momentum to rigid bodies.

ENGR 2150 - Introduction to Electrical Engineering

  • The lecture, simulation and laboratory provide the students with theoretical, mathematical, modeling, computational, and experimental background.
  • Understanding of scientific reasoning, i.e., basic scientific principles, the roles of hypothesis, theory, and experiment in the formation of physical laws in the context of the scientific method in the changing nature of science.
  • Analyzing, interpret, and evaluate scientific hypotheses and theories using rigorous methods (including mathematical, statistical, simulation, and experimental techniques).
  • Applying theoretical (knowledge of mathematics and physics), modern computational tools (to simulate) and experimental methods (laboratory equipment, methods and techniques) to identify, formulate and solve real world scientific and engineering problems and verify the solutions for limiting cases.
  • Use creative and critical thinking in appropriate concepts of physics to analyze qualitatively problems or situations involving the fundamental principles of physics modeling using appropriate mathematical techniques and concepts to obtain quantitative solutions using appropriate exact or approximate mathematical techniques.
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of laboratory and computer skills as they relate to gathering and comparing data to the predictions of theoretical models.
  • Ability to design settings of and conducting experiments, minimizing measurement errors, as well as, to analyze and interpret data.
  • Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  • Demonstrate basic communication skills by working in groups on laboratory experiments and the thoughtful discussion and interpretation of data.
  • Ability to thoughtfully discuss and interpret data and clearly communicate the results of scientific analysis in written, oral and visual form.
  • Ability to write and speak creatively and critically about essential questions in related topics using appropriate conventions and language.
  • Understanding of personal, professional and ethical integrity and responsibility.
  • Knowledge of contemporary issues necessary to understand the impact of scientific and engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

ENGR 2151 - Introduction to Electrical Engineering Lab

  • The lecture, simulation and laboratory classes provide the students with further theoretical, mathematical, modeling, computational, and experimental background.
  • Analyze, interpret, and evaluate scientific hypotheses and theories using rigorous methods (including mathematical, statistical, simulation, and experimental techniques).
  • Students will demonstrate ability to design and practice of appropriate laboratory investigation and conducting an experiment accurate physical measurements, understand experimental uncertainty, observing safety rules during the experiment, follow appropriate procedures during the experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • Reproduce results published in the professional literature.
  • Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  • Ability to clearly communicate the results of scientific analysis in written, oral and visual form.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write and speak critically about the essential questions addressed by Physics using appropriate conventions and language.
  • Explain assumptions and justify approximations used in the readings.
  • Understanding of personal, professional and ethical integrity and responsibility.
  • Knowledge of contemporary issues necessary to understand the impact of scientific and engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of laboratory and computer skills as they relate to gathering data and comparing data to the predictions of theoretical models, presentation of data both orally and in writing.
  • Students will demonstrate basic communication skills by working in groups on laboratory experiments and the thoughtful discussion and interpretation of data.
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

ENGR 2160 - Introduction to Engineering Analysis

  • To give the student the foundation of engineering analysis and its application to engineering problems.
  • To have the student demonstrate competency in EXCEL by setting up and solving engineering problems.
  • To have the student demonstrate competency in MATLAB by setting up and solving engineering problems.

ENGR 2320 - Digital Electronics

  • Students will become proficient and learn to analyze and synthesize digital logic circuits.
  • Learn various number systems and codes
  • Design of Boolean functions using NOT, AND, OR, EXOR, NAND and NOR gates
  • Sequential logic – using flip-flops, JK and D-type
  • Arithmetic logic circuits
  • Counters and registers
  • MSI and LSI logic families
  • Memory devices
  • PLCs
  • Introduction to µprocessors
  • Asynchronous and synchronous counters
  • D/A and A/D conversions
  • Shift registers
  • Data transfer
  • Encoders and decoders

ENGR-2520  Microprocessor and Microcomputers

  • Understanding of the basic concepts related to computer architectures such as the von Neumann and Harvard architecture.   
  • The ability to program a microcontroller at the assembly language level to create branches, use subroutine calls and interrupts and to configure peripherals such as the A/D and timers.   
  • Understanding of the terminology and uses associated with program and data memory maps, computer architecture block diagrams, and address, data, and control busses.  
  • The ability to write detailed lab reports to document the problem being solved, and the design and testing of software / firmware.  
  • The ability to use flowcharts to document code design. 
  • The ability to use an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) to single step through source code, set breakpoints and debug defective code.   
  • Understanding of the relationship between high level languages such as C, assembly language, machine language and microcode.   
  • The ability to create C language programs for microcontroller applications at an introductory level.   

ENGR-2540 Mechanics of Materials for Engineering

  • Review and calculate types of internal forces and moments; N, V, M, T
  • Introduce and explore the concepts of stress and strain as well as the relationship between them
  • Determine various types of stress including axial normal stress, direct shear stress, bearing stress, torsional shear stress, bending stress, beam shear stress
  • Determine the deformation of structural components under various independent loads
  • Define numerous material properties such as modulus of elasticity, Poison's ratio, modulus of rigidity
  • Introduce compatibility equations and use them to solve indeterminate problems
  • Analyze and calculate stress in problems involving combined loading conditions
  • Use stress transformation equations and Mohr's circle to perform plane stress transformations in both 2D and 3D
  • Introduce and calculate principal stresses and the principal planes on which they occur
  • Analyze columns defining stability, buckling, effective length, slenderness ratio, and critical load

ENGR-2620 Linear Systems

  • Learns definitions, units and symbols of basic electrical quantities – charge, current, voltage, power, energy and dependent and independent sources
  • Learns Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s current and voltage laws – resistors in series and parallel
  • Analysis of complex circuits, simultaneous equations, Kramer’s rule
  • Nodal and Mesh analysis techniques
  • Superposition, source transformation, linearity, Thevenin’s and Horton’s equivalent circuit
  • Introduction to operational amplifiers
  • SS functioning of capacitors and inductors
  • Natural and forced response of RL and RC circuits
  • Second order RLC circuits – natural and forced response
  • Review of transient analysis
  • Magnetic circuits – Faraday’s law of magnetic induction, AC sinusoidal analysis
  • AC analysis using mesh, nodal, Thevenin’s and Norton’s techniques
  • AC steady state power computation, power factor correction – use of transformers in power distribution

ENGR-2621 Linear Systems Lab

Students are required to perform the following experiments using both computer analysis techniques and by physical construction of appropriate circuits.

They need to be proficient in the use of instruments for measuring voltage, current, power, frequency and gain.

Laboratory experiments include:

  • Resistance, maximum power transfer, efficiency
  • Verification of Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s current and voltage laws
  • Series/parallel circuits
  • Nodal and mesh analysis
  • Transients in RL, RC, and RLC circuits
  • AC waveform measurements – use of oscilloscopes
  • Operational amplifier gain characteristics
  • Hi pass – low pass filters – frequency response