Continuous Quality Improvement Initiative


 Assumptions, January 2018

CQI

In 2014, 2015, and 2016, the Community College of Rhode Island participated in a campus-based assessment approach titled Multi-State Collaborative Project to Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment (MSC), which is a partnership among the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association, the Association of American Colleges and Universities and 13 states. The project focuses on three general education outcomes identified as common and essential for all graduates: quantitative literacy, written communication and critical thinking.

Over the three years of the project, more than ninety CCRI faculty members submitted samples of student work that demonstrated the ability to write, think critically, and reason quantitatively; and trained MSC faculty and other educational professionals from the other 12 participating states scored the samples using the VALUE rubrics. Reports were shared with the General Education Committee, the Department Chairs’ Council, and departments and faculty members that participated in the pilot.

At the October 2017 Department Chairs’ meeting, the data reviewed showed that one area in particular continued to require further development, that of Assumptions within Quantitative Literacy.   A motion was approved to adopt Assumptions as an academic quality improvement indicator.

CCRI kicked off the Assumptions campaign on January 26 when the college welcomed Geoff Pfeifer, associate teaching professor of philosophy and international and global studies at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Paula Quinn, associate director for the Center for Project-Based Learning at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, to present a workshop titled “Facilitating Student Consideration of Assumptions in Problem Solving”.

Each academic department will be working to develop our students’ ability to identify and evaluate assumptions when solving problems across the spectrum of academic disciplines. Specific assignments will prompt students to consider and question their own and others’ assumptions. Faculty will facilitate student consideration of assumptions when solving problems by developing activities that will foster habits of mind regarding awareness of and challenging assumptions.

Be on the lookout for our campaign on assumptions on each of CCRI’s four main campuses! 

Sources and Evidence, January 2017

CQI

In fall 2014, the Community College of Rhode Island participated in a pilot project titled Multi-State Collaborative Project to Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment (MSC), which is a partnership among the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association, the Association of American Colleges and Universities and nine states. The project focuses on three general education outcomes identified as common and essential for all disciplines: quantitative literacy, written communication and critical thinking.

Twenty-one CCRI faculty members submitted writing samples while faculty from the other eight participating states blindly analyzed them. Recently, results were shared with the General Education Committee, the Department Chairs’ Council, and departments and faculty members that participated in the pilot.

Data was presented at the September 2016 Department Chairs’ meeting and it was found that two areas required further development, one within written communication: Sources and Evidence, and one within Quantitative Literacy: Assumptions. A motion was approved to adopt Sources and Evidence as an academic quality improvement indicator for this academic year.

Our Sources and Evidence kickoff campaign began on Oct. 28 when the college welcomed Bonnie Orcutt, professor of economics at Worcester State University, to present a workshop titled “Sources and Evidence: Improving our Students’ Writing.”

This year, each academic department will be working to evaluate and improve upon the writing abilities of our students in the areas of sources and evidence. Specific writing assignments will track information related to the proper use of sources that writers use to develop, define or shape their ideas. Faculty will work with students to support their ideas using evidence that is high quality, credible, and relevant. Proper citation will also be considered.

This page developed and maintained by Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Send comments and suggestions to pbardsley@ccri.edu .


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Last Updated: 3/27/18